Harmut Haenchen to Record a Bruckner cycle

Harmut Haenchen to Record a Bruckner cycle
Photo: Peter Brill
Professor Harmut Haenchen, who recorded several Bruckner symphonies in the 1990's with the Netherlands Philharmonic Orchestra is now embarking on a Bruckner cycle along with some other major works. The cycle will use two Belgian Orchestras. More information can be found on Prof. Haenchen's website.

A translation of the website announcement and an essay by Prof. Haenchen has been translated to English and can be read below.

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Bruckner cycle
In Copenhagen (8th), Hartmut Haenchen continued his Bruckner cycle with a acclaimed performance he opened in Brussels (8th Symphony), Helsinki (5th), Madrid (3rd) and Brussels (3rd). In Brussels he will continue the cycle with the Te Deum and the 2nd Symphony (La Monnaie) as well as with the Belgian National Orchestra with the 4th Symphony.
The award-winning Leipzig record label GENUIN will present the live recording of the 8th Symphony with the Royal Danish Orchestra of Copenhagen on May 10th at the opening of the Dresden Music Festival.

The orchestra of the Royal Opera of La Monnaie in Brussels will be followed by the performance and recording of the Te Deum and the 2nd Symphony in the 3rd version. This will be followed by the Belgian National Orchestra with the first performance and first recording of Bruckner's 4th Symphony in the Critical New Edition by Benjamin Korstvedt. MWV Wien, 2018. This is combined with Johannes Brahms's Symphony No. 1 according to Meininger sources and Fritz Steinbach's notes after Brahms's rehearsal instructions.
Over the next few years, all symphonies and a few other major works will be performed in full in Brussels with both orchestras and simultaneously recorded for CD.

The draft text with all footnotes and sources is available at the end of the text as a pdf.

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"Powerful Music"

"Because the present world situation is spiritually weakness, I flee to strength and write powerful music"
In contrast to his "exalted", "beloved master" Richard Wagner, who advanced his works in ever finer transitions, Bruckner's powerful juxtaposition and opposition prevails. An assembly technique that makes any number of attempts for a climax possible. Only in the late work from the 8th Symphony there are more through-composed transitions. Until then, the break is the moment in which the music evolves inaudibly. (Wagner has perfected this idea in the reverse development of his musical style in his Parsifal). His symphonies were to be "solemn" and he thus already follows a principle originating from the genesis of the symphonic form. And "big" and "sublime", as it was demanded then, his symphonies are quite sure. The few examples of the symphonic large form of Beethoven (9th Symphony), Schubert (Great C Major), Mendelssohn (Lobgesang) he expands into the gigantic. The little-played 1st version of his Third Symphony is the first step in a new monumental form that had to confuse his contemporaries, as any great musical innovation in music history. Even in the topic invention, he goes far beyond the classic role models: The development process of his subjects does not end, as in the classic, with the implementation, but continues into the coda. His theme invention is always wide-ranging, hardly a topic that does not exceed the octave. But these fifth-octave-themed themes pose a difficult challenge for any performer. These themes, which are constantly overlapping in contrapuntal work and thus deprived of contrapuntal resistance, can also be made audible as such. Although Bruckner was a teacher of traditional counterpoint, he found new solutions for himself. Guido Adler therefore rightly calls Bruckner's mode of operation the "polyphonic" movement. The introduction of a third theme, is standard with him, which previously existed only in exceptional cases. For Bruckner, it was possible to add a choral form everywhere. His unison of rhythm is at the climaxes as a summary of previous developments his characteristic. Schopenhauer's sentence is probably better suited to no other composer than to Bruckner: "Music is an unconscious exercise in metaphysics in which the mind does not know that it philosophizes." He wanted to develop a form "that seeks the supernatural order ... seeks". As the number of symphonies progresses, he develops the brass instruments away from the previously customary harmonic filling function into the dominant and thematically important group of instruments.

The fact that Bruckner started composing symphonies from the beginning on a very personal level is also due to the fact that he began experimenting with this form very late - at the age of 40. Nevertheless, each performer must be careful not to interpret Bruckner's early works from the perspective of his late works, but also to make the aftermath of his role models audible.

His few explanations in terms of the "new German program music" are either very naive or a sarcastic fun for the "ignorant" writers or much dryer to the conductor Hermann Levi, while he almost comic "New German" for the 8th Symphony to Felix Weingartner formulated. But Bruckner was certainly never a "new German" composer. His strength lay in the further development of the traditional forms such as fairs, Te Deum, string quintet and symphonies. Symphonic poems were not Bruckner's thing and his relationship to the artistic word was certainly very low despite later thoughts about an opera, which should have a substance like Lohengrin. Bruckner's artistic friendship with Wagner, which Bruckner repeatedly portrayed, was Bruckner's invention and one-sided.

In questions of instrumentation he adhered to the classical canon: the classical excludes drums in symphonic works. (The timpani was rightly considered a musical instrument with its tonal ties.) The exception in classical music were only the pieces that should characterize a foreign music (eg Turkish music). In this respect, Bruckner was certainly quite far from installing a cymbal stroke of his own accord in his symphonies. The Schalck brothers of a generation like Gustav Mahler or Hugo Wolf did not have these scruples, so they were happy when Bruckner allowed the cymbal stroke in the 7th Symphony initiated by Arthur Nikisch. With all the effect he makes: He is a foreign body in Bruckner's sound world. On the other hand, Bruckner would have been able to remove the glued-in piece of paper with the cymbal stroke from his score, if he absolutely did not want it, because he knew that the score would reach the National Library in Vienna and thus also the status reached the last will of the composer. He also struggled with the harps to add them to the orchestra. In contrast, he has welcomed Siegfried Ochs' proposal to add a 3rd timpani with a h-vortex in the Te Deum. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. if he absolutely did not want to have it, because he knew that the score would reach the National Library in Vienna and thus reach the status of the last will of the composer. He also struggled with the harps to add them to the orchestra. In contrast, he has welcomed Siegfried Ochs' proposal to add a 3rd timpani with a h-vortex in the Te Deum. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. if he absolutely did not want to have it, because he knew that the score would reach the National Library in Vienna and thus reach the status of the last will of the composer. He also struggled with the harps to add them to the orchestra. In contrast, he has welcomed Siegfried Ochs' proposal to add a 3rd timpani with a h-vortex in the Te Deum. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. that the score would thus reach the National Library in Vienna and thus also reach the status of the last will of the composer. He also struggled with the harps to add them to the orchestra. In contrast, he has welcomed Siegfried Ochs' proposal to add a 3rd timpani with a h-vortex in the Te Deum. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. that the score would thus reach the National Library in Vienna and thus also reach the status of the last will of the composer. He also struggled with the harps to add them to the orchestra. In contrast, he has welcomed Siegfried Ochs' proposal to add a 3rd timpani with a h-vortex in the Te Deum. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. Timpani with a h-vortex add joyfully welcomes. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress. Timpani with a h-vortex add joyfully welcomes. In other words, he considered it quite legitimate to supplement the passages that were not playable for the usual two classical timpani, which is quite capable today of performing a machine drummer. For Bruckner, all performances of the late versions were work in progress.
He often wished for dynamic changes even after the last version. This is also because many dynamic terms rather describe the prevailing mood than the actual volume and thus are misleading. In several cases, Bruckner himself also causes confusion: For example, he writes in the 3rd Symphony at the beginning of the second movement in the first version of a three-bar crescendo fork and in the third version, he divides this fork in two and one bar, what exactly means an interruption of the crescendo. The comparison with musically identical passages and in connection with the original idea, this notation is most likely an error Bruckner.


"Me donkey !!!" (The versions)

Bruckner, the brilliant, great improviser on the organ, was always able to illuminate the same basic ideas differently. So we have to understand the variety of versions of his symphonies. Of course, the unauthorized versions forbid themselves. The first versions are always the most archaic and uncompromising and offer a very special appeal when pushing into new territory. Why are there so many versions of some symphonies?
On the one hand, Bruckner was in the pursuit of being performed in the hands of students and friends who, like him, worshiped Wagner, but who wanted to transfer Wagner's sound world to Bruckner. In the first years of performances, Bruckner's music was never played without retouching. They wanted to hear Wagner's sound in Bruckner's music. That was the basic misunderstanding. Bruckner himself had a little support for this misunderstanding in some of his reworkings if he changed in that direction. On the other hand, Bruckner's chromaticism never reached or wanted to achieve the eroticism of Wagner, but sometimes Bruckner Wagner was well ahead in terms of harmony.
Well-meaning friends advised him on many compositional questions, what he would have to do differently in order to be performed. In individual cases, it is difficult to distinguish where the good or bad advice of other Bruckner influenced. In any case, the versions that Bruckner has approved, but for him were only pragmatic solutions to be listed at all: "Please be sure to cut the finale as it is indicated; because it would be far too long and applies only later times and indeed for a circle of friends and connoisseurs. "In any case, Bruckner came by his own admission often to other solutions. And he has clearly made many things "of his own accord". Sometimes he found too high technical difficulties due to "unplayable violin figures", sometimes "the instrumentation was too overloaded", sometimes it was too long, or the "addiction to imitations" and too much "octave advances". On the other hand, there were certainly friends like Hans Richter, who most often performed his works in Bruckner's lifetime, Hermann Levi and Gustav Mahler (the latter occasionally shortened in Bruckner's symphonies), who recognized the value of the original versions and wanted to prevent the original Bruckner's sometimes revolutionary language is lost: "... everything is just as it is, including the instrumentation!"

After all pros and cons against each version we should trust the composer, who could have resorted to recommendations to conductors quite the respective situation on earlier versions. According to his testimonies and testimonies of his statements, at least for the symphonies Nos. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8, it is proven that Bruckner regarded the last version as valid. To understand Bruckner's workshop, of course, all previous versions, which have no pragmatic changes, a performance right and often more clearly testify to the revolutionary ideas Bruckner.


"Quite ad libitum" (the tempo and the performance practice)

When considering the interpretation of Bruckner's music, we must first realize that the "interpreter", the conductor, with his granted freedoms only in the course of the New German School, to which Bruckner is also wrong, developed his new, dominant role , The music directors and concert masters of the 18th century did not see it as their task to make their individual views the basis of their performances. They felt responsible for implementing the unrecorded conventions, the rules of the performance practice of their time. The new role of the conductor, which was necessitated among other things by the ever-growing orchestral apparatuses, was to create the "idea of ??the composer". So first, it was about understanding things, which were noted in the score and also not recorded, since they were taken for granted as part of the performance practice. A composer-conductor such as Richard Wagner took a new path in the context of social changes that made socially acceptable, even larger visible physical commitment, a new path, the composer had already outlined Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: The old works had to be processed according to the time and with the Freedom of time to be listed. The new works were given more room for maneuver, and as time went on they expanded. Of the composers who also conducted, it gradually developed into conductors who did not or hardly ever composed and the freedoms that they took which were no longer based on the performance practice of the composer's time, increased steadily. This sometimes ominous development, led to many subtleties unlisted in the respective time were forgotten. Against this background, the tempo choice at Bruckner should also be considered:
"Misterioso. Not fast "but" Alla breve "stands above the unfinished last movement of Bruckner's 9th Symphony. This sounds like a sweeping summary of Bruckner's tempo conception, which somehow remains completely in the middle and must give enough space for the "clarity" demanded of it. Also in other symphonies the tempo instruction is a "both as well". If "Misterioso" is an atmospheric designation, "Not Fast" is not really a definite tempo instruction, which in turn suggests a quick tempo due to the pre-drawn semi-beat of the "Alle breve" in the audio result. Fast tempo markings are the absolute exception for Bruckner except for his "brisk broom" of the first symphony and there the scherzo in the second version is already reduced from "fast" to "lively", but as far as not connected with an "alla breve". As much as the names above Bruckner's last set of symphonies can be taken as a heading for his vague idea of ??tempo, so important is the understanding of this very imagination. The meter, which determines the speed of the vocal lines that are important to him, is crucial to Bruckner, not the speed of the single note. In this respect, he is still a classic, for the singing was the foundation of all music. So we have to look for the style of the time and look at the parameters of score notation at the time: which determines the speed of the vocal lines that are important to him, is crucial to Bruckner and not the speed of the individual score. In this respect, he is still a classic, for the singing was the foundation of all music. So we have to look for the style of the time and look at the parameters of score notation at the time: which determines the speed of the vocal lines that are important to him, is crucial to Bruckner and not the speed of the individual score. In this respect, he is still a classic, for the singing was the foundation of all music. So we have to look for the style of the time and look at the parameters of score notation at the time:
There are relatively few statements by Bruckner about the tempo, and we are not in the fortunate position of Johannes Brahms that one of his conductor friends recorded all rehearsal notes, as Fritz Steinbach did. For a long time, these records of Brahms' symphonies were largely unknown due to the turmoil of the Second World War and led to many interpretational misunderstandings. Brahms's letter to Joseph Joachim, who, just like Bruckner, speaks of unpublished tempo modifications, was not in the minds of the interpreters: "I have entered some modifications of the tempo with pencil in the score. They may be useful, indeed necessary, for a first performance. Unfortunately, they often come into print (with me and others) - where they usually do not belong. "Since there were - to the annoyance of Bruckner - some conductors who performed both Brahms and Bruckner symphonies, we can assume that it was part of the style of the time, regardless of different personal styles, that many subtle tempo modifications are taken for granted were assumed, even if these small changes were not indicated in the score. At Bruckner we find this quite natural, as confirmed by Brahms: First of all, Bruckner was famous from his time as choirmaster for the "delicacy of nuances". But also in the preparation for the performances, he wanted to be there at least for some rehearsals, because it was "in the score much important and frequent tempo changes not noted." So he represents the same principle as Brahms, just to write the basic instructions in the score. Even to his faithful disciples, he did not always trust a truly correct tempo name: "Then I would very much like to ask you to let me hear, because of the tempos." This is all the more interesting, as the Schalck brothers in their mutual letters, to perform as Tempo Pope of Bruckner's works: "Scherzo u. Finale for the most part much too slow u. without any understanding, but with beneficial purity. "or:" Much sadder is the fact that Mottl'n did not grasp the understanding of Bruckner's genius. He directed with a smiling face. The tempi made the delicate motifs banal Gefidel. The very intricate thread of the thematic work eluded the listener through unclear performance. It is disgusting to write about it and I am bitterly regretful to have entertained Mottln for the performance which has done more harm than good. "Bruckner just now - unlike the brothers Schalck - the tempi" quite adlibitum (like They need it to clarify). It becomes even more difficult when we know that Bruckner himself intervened against his own designations and declared them wrong without actually changing them in the score: "Concerning the quintet, I ask very much, the scherzo not so exactly the preliminary drawing but to take the Andante's second part until the beginning of the beginning again. "An indication that he wanted to have played that or maybe even the trio (s) more slowly, even if it is not prescribed. "The quintet has to be played more slowly; especially in the 1st movement of the vocal period the answers of the viola; then the second part of the scherzo until the repetition of the beginning of it is almost to take Andante. "But again and again it is about unrecorded tempo modifications:" The scherzo must be very fast; the tempo changes are indispensable. "But the interpreters also made sure that Bruckner had unlisted details:" ... your wishes concerning the lecture, especially the tempos and dynamic nuances, to be able to communicate with us on this occasion. "Like Brahms, he insisted that a clear style would assert itself by exemplary performances, even if there were still no sound carriers: "If the same judge would direct, who is exactly instructed by me; then the Germans hear how the same is to be performed. "And obviously Bruckner was also not fine in dealing with his interpreters, if it did not happen as he imagined:" Bruckner ... ... tortured me so much that only a voice of general outrage against him prevailed. ... no disgust is too low in his excitement. "It is striking, however, that it was precisely the symphonies conducted by Bruckner himself that failed, and the performance of proper, experienced orchestral conductors helped him succeed. Many of the world premieres among other conductors were quite successful for Bruckner (Messen, Te Deum, Symphonies 1, 2, 3, 6), contrary to the widely held opinion. "Bruckner ... ... tormented me so much that only one voice of general outrage prevailed against him. ... no disgust is too low in his excitement. "It is striking, however, that it was precisely the symphonies conducted by Bruckner himself that failed, and the performance of proper, experienced orchestral conductors helped him succeed. Many of the world premieres among other conductors were quite successful for Bruckner (Messen, Te Deum, Symphonies 1, 2, 3, 6), contrary to the widely held opinion. "Bruckner ... ... tormented me so much that only one voice of general outrage prevailed against him. ... no disgust is too low in his excitement. "It is striking, however, that it was precisely the symphonies conducted by Bruckner himself that failed, and the performance of proper, experienced orchestral conductors helped him succeed. Many of the world premieres among other conductors were quite successful for Bruckner (Messen, Te Deum, Symphonies 1, 2, 3, 6), contrary to the widely held opinion.
The discrepancy between imagination and its own realization became very clear at Bruckner. However, if 90 minutes of music had already been played in concert in front of a work such as the Fourth Symphony, then a symphony by Bruckner would inevitably have been very difficult to capture the attention of the audience.
Bruckner's great role model Richard Wagner was forced by his exile to give us, so to speak, the proof of the numerous not recorded in the scoreTempomodifikationen by writing things that he could not otherwise convey. He wrote for example in the Tannhäuser a total of twenty new metronome numbers as major serious tempo changes, without verbally setting this by a new tempo. Then there are the countless small tempo modifications handed down by Felix Mottl from the Viennese rehearsals. A prime example of performance practice in the second half of the 19th century, which as well as the examples of Brahms apply to Bruckner.

Take the example of Bruckner's Symphony No. 7, which is in the autograph without tempo markings and is provided with 4/4 prefix and where Bruckner states that he (!) Has chosen a too fast pace. The first edition at Gutmann has then also the reason ready: There is the 4/4-Vorzeichnung on Alla breve changed and "Moved, but not fast" with the MM number half = 63 added. The Bruckner obviously had a hard time imagining the tempo in the composition itself (as, incidentally, the majority of composers who describe the work at a faster pace than they would have liked to do) show the letter: "I was last on 2 pianos by H Schalk u. Lion played the finale of the 7th Symphony, and then I saw that I should have chosen a speed that was too fast. "
The few surviving remarks Bruckner, the white point out that he often wanted it slower than stated or just modified. Although at Bruckner in his time - in contrast to Wagner, who demanded ever faster tempi - mostly for quieter tempos pleaded in his works, there was after Bruckner's death and the demise of his apologists as well as Wagner one, if not tend to be so extreme Slowing down the tempo. The performance times are difficult to compare, because earlier conductors often conducted Bruckner's symphonies with jumps and / or in the Schalck arrangements. Interesting, however, is that the probably slowest Bruckner conductor Sergiu Celibidache needed 1:25:30 in 1975, then 1979 1:32:30, 1990 1:42:21 and 1993 1:44: 00 so slowed down almost 20 minutes. Other conductors also become much slower in the course of life: Wilhelm Furtwängler 1949: 1:16:08 and 1954: 1:21:44, Eugen Jochum 1978 1:15:06 and 1982 1: 23:48.

Also from the score instructions of the next generation it becomes clear that such "self-evident" tempo modifications were expected, otherwise Gustav Mahler would have had no reason in his instructions against this performance practice of the time with frequent remarks like "do not lug" or "do not hurry" to lift this practice. From other sources it also becomes clear that Mahler naturally started from certain playing styles and tempo modifications that were not written down: Willem Mengelberg noted in his score the rehearsal notes of Mahler's conductors and there we find remarks such as "not rush too much" in places where nothing is noted in Mahler's score, but he obviously assumes that the pace goes on without it being stated. It just should not be "too much". His comments written in the score do not contradict this, but merely show that if he did not want to follow this performance practice, he also notes it. His remarks only make sense if a certain modified tempo treatment belonged to the time style.

It's not just about two great composers in the second half of the 19th century. Richard Wagner shows us that tempo flexibility, without which everything is quoted, belonged to the standard of music practice and was then quite naturally applied to the works of classical music. Thus, the recurring blanket criticism of the Schalck brothers, who have worked tirelessly for Bruckner again and again and brought numerous changes in the scores, must be questioned: What are arbitrarinesses, what is owed to the fact of making the works even easier to perform What belongs to the style of the time in which Bruckner thought and composed - after all, the two were his students. It is certainly a mistake to present all the suggestions of the brothers Schalck and other loyalists as a falsification of Bruckner's work, because performance-typical peculiarities of the Bruckner period, which Bruckner naturally took for granted, would not be taken into account. As we know from the versions of the Third Symphony, Bruckner has made a very clear distinction as to which suggestions or arbitrarinesses of the Schalcks were good and which he did not want to take over. In the finale of the 3rd Symphony he accepted two of Schalke's cuts and saw the benefit of a third cut, but replaced it with a new composition. Before the interpreter, therefore, there is a careful consideration of every detail so as not to fall into the error, to eliminate completely essential basics of Bruckner's musical way of thinking through the mere presentation of the musical text. Already the and Bruckner leads us on the way of the unrecorded tempo changes, if he writes an a tempo several times at formally marked place or marks a tempo 1, without that before a tempo change would be indicated. He notes the end of the tempo freedom.
A master of the smallest transition like Alban Berg (born when Bruckner wrote his 7th symphony) did not fall out of nowhere. He combines - this time with meticulous information - the subtle tempo changes he grew up with. The composers who followed the classical tradition before him did not consider the recording of the small differences necessary. Brahms, Bruckner and Wagner have expressly stated this, as stated above. They assumed that the pattern performance under their direction or presence would make this flexibility a performance-based approach. Unfortunately, that did not work out, so the next generation, like Mahler and Berg, went through other ways of notation.
From these examples we can deduce that Bruckner's works, although much more blocky than other works of the time, demand a great deal of flexibility.
Hans Swarowsky's opinion that one should not accept the traditional tempo modifications is therefore not fully tenable, although his article on the 5th Symphony Bruckner is one of the most important suggestions for Bruckner interpretation.
The same is true of instructions for the dynamics: in some surviving letters, he adds dynamic terms that are not noted in the score and that can be considered as a guide for dynamic retouching today. Also in some questions of performance practice Bruckner tries to circumvent the usual ways of playing in his time. He tried to avoid the then usual, unlisted portamenti by using special line types. So they are also an integral part of the articulation. His strikingly numerous smear instructions for the strings are at the same time also to be understood as articulation, which, despite the tenuto name, can not yield a full length of the tonal value. Therefore it is recommended to play sometimes uncomfortable line styles or at least to draw articulatory consequences. He tried to counteract the general shortening of note values ??which was still customary at that time with the terms "kept". Often this is misunderstood as a tempo statement. On the other hand, he wants to pre-emptate real legato, especially on sellen, where other instruments actually play a different articulation, and notes "deleted" or "drawn". He has still refined his dynamics even after the completion of a work. Also striking is his use of different types of accents: from sforzato over the horizontal arrow to the slight emphasis on the accent roof, which is misunderstood by many performers as a major accent. It is only to be understood as a sign that these notes should not be taken easier, as was the case in classical music. In contrast to the different accent forms, the fortepiano, when it emerges from a crescendo, is not an accent but the sudden piano after a climax of the forte. An eternal misunderstanding of performance practice. Bruckner, who is exactly betweenritenuto (restrained, ie evenly slow) and ritardando (delaying, that is, gradually slower) makes a difference and almost all interpreters play both as ritardando .
The written music is only a beginning, everything that comes then, you can not note in musical notation.

"Insufferable" (Man)

"Bruckner, of course, has made hell hot enough for me ... It is really impossible to continue to do anything for him in his presence. The demon drives him to the most incredible malice and sects, no suspicion, no shame is too low in his excitement. Miraculously, through all these hardships, I have come through perfectly. Judge of the thing also experienced Bruckner his behavior before u. Finally, half jokingly said: "You should only write at all; if they do not compose, they are unbearable! "" This sigh of his student Josef Schalck is also confirmed in other contemporary reports. The image still reigns, of the lonely, submissive, misunderstood composer. "He probably bowed to certain unpleasant requirements of the day, but before himself and those who understood him, he was filled with indomitable pride, personal and artistic, the pride of the true believer. "If we look more closely, we find Bruckner's subservience again and again when he wanted to achieve something for himself. His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". he was filled with indomitable pride, personal and artistic, the pride of the true believer. "If we take a closer look, we find Bruckner's subservience again and again when he wanted to achieve something for himself. His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". he was filled with indomitable pride, personal and artistic, the pride of the true believer. "If we take a closer look, we find Bruckner's subservience again and again when he wanted to achieve something for himself. His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". from the pride of the true believer. "If we take a closer look, we will always find Bruckner's submissiveness when he wanted to achieve something for himself. His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". from the pride of the true believer. "If we take a closer look, we will always find Bruckner's submissiveness when he wanted to achieve something for himself. His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". His humility, too, was a means to an end. And his modesty had the same reasons. If he invents the positive judgments of others in order to take advantage of them, that is not necessarily a sign of modesty. He put Wagner's whole lyrics in his mouth for the glory of his own music, especially when he had already died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". especially when he died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.". especially when he died. Wagner himself was much more restrained in his quite positive judgment: "I have recently reviewed the symphony (No. 3), very good, very good, perform, perform, that must be performed.".
And when he says: "You can not ask Wagner for nothing if you do not want to forget his favor." So it is also about his own advantage, which he wants to draw from his subservience. As much as Bruckner tried to stick to the hierarchy rules, so much did he stand in the way of himself as a person who stepped down and was submissive to the top. Finally, he did not get the job as Hofkapellmeister in Vienna, because he blocked the way by wrong behavior himself. It was certainly not his suitability.
Bruckner was well aware of his value as an outstanding composer. The fact that he gave all the original manuscripts of his most important works to the kuk Hofbibliothek in Vienna as a testament speaks a clear language.

His judgment on composer colleagues, with the exception of Wagner, was not modest.
Surely Bruckner was not an eloquent man, but in Devotion he was a master who could drive ridiculousness to ridicule. Unlike his composer colleagues, however, literature and other arts were not objects of inspiration or general interest. You could describe him as an anti-intellectual. His pupil and apologist Felix Mottl calls him "provocatively uneducated".
On the one hand, he berates Hans Richter that, in view of the expected bad reviews by Eduard Hanslick, he does not perform his works and, on the other hand, bans his works for Viennese performances in order to avoid Hanslick's bad reviews. In turn, Hans Richter overruled this ban and helped Bruckner to another success. The conductor Hermann Levi laments: "For many years I have been used to people distorting their face to either a sympathetic smile or a mocking grin at the mere mention of this name so dear to me ..." and excuses Bruckner with "his ingenious naivety".

Bruckner was a man with many nervous crises, who expressed themselves in depression and obsessional neurosis in 1867, 1875, including his counting mania. But especially in the mental tusks he was especially creative. Already in Linz Bruckner was announced "Irrsin as possible consequence". His piety ended in religious madness.
Johannes Brahms excuses Bruckner's manner: "He is a poor, crazy man whom the clergy of St. Florian have on their conscience. I do not know if you have any idea what it means to have spent his youth with the priests? "
The violent anti-Semitic remarks of his disciples must not have escaped him and he never opposed this. He himself commented, "If G. does not behave very docile u. neatly crawls to the cross, which is going to be very strange to the Jew, so I take the quintet away from him. "When he was supposed to sit Fritz von Uhde for a sacrament painting as an apostle model, he commented on the request with" Yes, I am. " maybe a Jew? "But as long as Jewish artists championed him, he, like his master Wagner, liked to claim it.

Contrary to his repeated claims in numerous letters, he was well financially secure. He even made it to spend some time in the most expensive establishment of the city opposite the State Opera, before a student and patrons gave him a free apartment overlooking the Kahlenberg. From other side came quite support. For example, Emperor Franz Joseph I took over some printing costs of Bruckner's works. However, he did not have the freedom to work as a freelance composer. But he actually wanted to lead a real bourgeois life. Of course, this included all the exams he took back into relatively old age and, of course, a civil marriage that was not granted to him. His love for much younger women, lasting until the end of his life, is certainly one of the reasons why he did not marry any of the many ladies he venerated. Even Wagner's daughter Eva became one of the goals of his advances. The age difference with the just 18 years was at least 43 years. May he have played his devotion to Wagner here: The majority were the girls, for whom he was quickly inflamed servants, salesgirls, flower girls, waitresses and partly illiterate. It always ended in a similar way: "I am very sorry not to be able to accept the proposal which is so flattering to me, and you are only permitted to measure this to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " why he had failed to marry any of the many ladies he worshiped. Even Wagner's daughter Eva became one of the goals of his advances. The age difference with the just 18 years was at least 43 years. May he have played his devotion to Wagner here: The majority were the girls, for whom he was quickly inflamed servants, salesgirls, flower girls, waitresses and partly illiterate. It always ended in a similar way: "I am very sorry not to be able to accept the proposal which is so flattering to me, and you are only permitted to measure this to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " why he had failed to marry any of the many ladies he worshiped. Even Wagner's daughter Eva became one of the goals of his advances. The age difference with the just 18 years was at least 43 years. May he have played his devotion to Wagner here: The majority were the girls, for whom he was quickly inflamed servants, salesgirls, flower girls, waitresses and partly illiterate. It always ended in a similar way: "I am very sorry not to be able to accept the proposal which is so flattering to me, and you are only permitted to measure this to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " The age difference with the just 18 years was at least 43 years. May he have played his devotion to Wagner here: The majority were the girls, for whom he was quickly inflamed servants, salesgirls, flower girls, waitresses and partly illiterate. It always ended in a similar way: "I am very sorry not to be able to accept the proposal which is so flattering to me, and you are only permitted to measure this to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " The age difference with the just 18 years was at least 43 years. May he have played his devotion to Wagner here: The majority were the girls, for whom he was quickly inflamed servants, salesgirls, flower girls, waitresses and partly illiterate. It always ended in a similar way: "I am very sorry not to be able to accept the proposal which is so flattering to me, and you are only permitted to measure this to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " to be unable to accept the request so flattering to me, and to judge that only to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. " to be unable to accept the request so flattering to me, and to judge that only to my youth; Also, please do not ask me to hope in the future either. "

New ways

Since 2015, the Anton Bruckner Urtext Complete Edition has been published in the Bruckner Edition Wien, a label of the publishing group Hermann, Vienna. Patron was Nikolaus Harnoncourt. The publishing house has Alexander Hermann; the editor is Benjamin-Gunnar Cohrs. This fundamentally redesigned, scholarly-practical complete edition, together with a planned series of publications, will inspire the Bruckner interpretation and reception in many details. At the same time, the Musikwissenschaftliche Verlag Wien, which has traditionally published the works of Bruckner, has launched a further complete scientific edition of the new edition of the First Symphony .

Bruckner's own writings have only a few musical mistakes in comparison to other composers. However, in terms of performance practice (dynamics, articulations, tempos, etc.) they present particular problems because such game instructions were added in the last step. The complex source of his works also requires that in addition to the autographs and the handwritten voice materials, first editions and associated printing flags and secondary documents must be included. This is where the complete Urtext edition comes in: All sources are first subjected to a fundamental overall view and presented in a new context in a scientific-practical original text. As far as the material is processed, it is included in this Bruckner cycle. Hartmut Haenchen is in direct contact with the publishers and will use every opportunity to incorporate these scientific findings. According to availability, Hartmut Haenchen prepares orchestral materials for him.

All rights with Prof. dr. hc Hartmut Haenchen